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Houston Cars & Coffee Continues to Grow…we need a bigger shopping mall

October 6th’s get together was no different than many others…dozens of Lamborghini’s, McLarens, and everything else you can imagine. It was ‘Porsche Day’, and 2ndcar came out with our 914 Race Car and Weissach 928 (both are available on the site for sale). If you are local or passing through town, C&C is the first Saturday of every month and THE car event in Houston to go to. Nov 3rd is the next one, and make sure you’re early…parking fills up FAST!!


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The dirt on ‘clean’ EVs is under the hood

October 16, 2018 @ 8:30 amNiclas Rolander, Jesper Starn and Elisabeth BehrmannBloomberg
An electric car’s carbon footprint can grow quite large, depending on how it’s charged. Photo credit: BLOOMBERGSend us a LetterHave an opinion about this story? Click here to submit a Letter to the Editor, and we may publish it in print. Beneath the hoods of millions of the clean electric cars rolling onto the world’s roads in the next few years will be a dirty battery. Every major carmaker has plans for electric vehicles to cut greenhouse gas emissions, yet their manufacturers are, by and large, making lithium ion batteries in places with some of the most polluting grids in the world. By 2021, capacity will exist to build batteries for more than 10 million cars running on 60 kilowatt-hour packs, according to data of Bloomberg NEF. Most supply will come from places like China, Thailand, Germany and Poland that rely on nonrenewable sources such as coal for electricity. “We’re facing a bow wave of additional CO2 emissions,” said Andreas Radics, a managing partner at Munich-based automotive consultancy Berylls Strategy Advisors, which argues that for now, drivers in Germany or Poland may still be better off with an efficient diesel engine. The findings, among the more bearish ones around, show that while electric cars are emission-free on the road, they still discharge a lot of the carbon dioxide that conventional cars do. Just to build each car battery — weighing upwards of 1,100 pounds in size for utilities — would emit up to 74 percent more C02 than producing an efficient conventional car if it’s made in a factory powered by fossil fuels in a place such as Germany, according to Berylls’ findings. Yet regulators haven’t set out clear guidelines on acceptable carbon emissions over the life cycle of electric cars, even as the likes of China, France and the U.K. move toward outright bans of combustion engines.Content From IHS Markit

HVAC in Electric Vehicles

HVAC systems in automobiles, irrespective of propulsion systems, have become an intrinsic part of automobile cabin comfort today. Global warming is causing extreme seasonal swings in ambient temperatures, increasing the need for effective and efficient HVAC solutions for automotive cabin comfort. Read more > “It will come down to where is the battery made, how is it made, and even where do we get our electric power from,” said Henrik Fisker, CEO of Fisker Inc., a California-based developer of electric vehicles. For perspective, the average German car owner could drive a gas-guzzling vehicle for three and a half years, or more than 50,000 kilometers, before a Nissan Leaf with a 30 kWh battery would beat it on carbon-dioxide emissions in a coal-heavy country, Berylls estimates show. And that’s one of the smallest batteries on the market: BMW’s i3 has a 42 kWh battery, Mercedes’s upcoming EQC crossover will have a 80 kWh battery, and Audi’s e-tron will come in at 95 kWh. With such heavy batteries, an electric car’s carbon footprint can grow quite large even beyond the showroom, depending on how it’s charged. Driving in France, which relies heavily on nuclear power, will spit out a lot less CO2 than Germany, where 40 percent of the grid burns on coal. “It’s not a great change to move from diesel to German coal power,” said NorthVolt AB CEO Peter Carlsson, a former Tesla manager who is trying to build a 4 billion euro ($4.6 billion) battery plant in Sweden that would run on hydropower. “Electric cars will be better in every way, but of course, when batteries are made in a coal-based electricity system it will take longer” to surpass diesel engines, he said. To be sure, other studies show that even in coal-dominant Poland, using an electric car would emit 25 percent less carbon dioxide than a diesel car, according to Transport & Environment Brussels, a body that lobbies the European Union for sustainable environmental policy. The benefit of driving battery cars in cities will be immediate: their quiet motors will reduce noise pollution and curb toxins such as nitrogen oxide, a chemical compound spewed from diesel engines that’s hazardous to air quality and human health. “In downtown Oslo, Stockholm, Beijing or Paris, the most immediate consideration is to improve air quality and the quality of life for the people who live there,” said Christoph Stuermer, the global lead analyst for PricewaterhouseCoopers Autofacts. But electric cars aren’t as clean as they could be. Just switching to renewable energy for manufacturing would slash emissions by 65 percent, according to Transport & Environment. In Norway, where hydroelectric energy powers practically the entire grid, the Berylls study showed electric cars generate nearly 60 percent less CO2 over their lifetime, compared with even the most efficient fuel-powered vehicles. As it is now, manufacturing an electric car pumps out “significantly” more climate-warming gases than a conventional car, which releases only 20 percent of its lifetime C02 at this stage, according to estimates of Mercedes-Benz’s electric-drive system integration department. “Life-cycle emissions in electric vehicles depend on how much the car is driven in order to get to a point of crossover on diesels,” Ola Kallenius, the Daimler AG board member who will take over as CEO next year, said at the Paris Motor Show this month. “By 2030, the life cycle issue will improve.” Some manufacturers have heeded calls to produce batteries in a more sustainable way. Tesla uses solar power at its Gigafactory for batteries in Nevada, and has plans for similar plants in Europe and Shanghai. Chinese firm Contemporary Amperex Technology Co. is also looking to power its future German plant with renewables. “The topic of CO2 lifetime evaluations is starting to get more traction,” said Radics at Berylls. “Carmakers need to be transparent in this discussion to avoid unsettling buyers.”
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Is another Schumacher in the winds for F1?

By Matt Morlidge

Mick Schumacher has been backed to emulate his legendary father and become “one of the greats” after sealing his first single-seater championship. Schumacher, the son of seven-time Formula 1 world champion Michael, claimed the European Formula 3 title with a race to spare at Hockenheim on Saturday. It has been a breakthrough season for the 19-year-old, part of the Mercedes-powered PREMA squad.   Early on in his career, Schumacher raced under his mother’s maiden name of Betsch to avoid the extra attention and pressure but now he is earning praise, regardless of his surname. “Attention was focused on the youngster right from the start, and he was under a lot of pressure,” said Mercedes F1 boss Toto Wolff. “It’s not easy coping with all that, especially if the season does not get off to the best of starts, as in this case. “His performance in the second half of the season was therefore all the more impressive. He has shown that he has what it takes and that he can become one of the greats in our sport.” Gerhard Berger, the former Ferrari driver and 10-time F1 race-winner, added: “Mick has the racing genes of Michael. If he can continue to deliver performances like these, he will find his way into F1.” By claiming the championship, Mick has earned a ‘super license’ to compete in F1 next year but considering the dearth of seats on the grid, it is far more likely that he takes the next step up the motorsport ladder in Formula Two. Schumacher has not yet been snapped up by an F1 team for their junior programme, but has been linked with Mercedes due to his F3 affiliation, while Ferrari, where his father won five of his championships, have also expressed an interest. “We will see about the future,” said Ferrari chief Maurzio Arrivabene in September. “How can you say no, in Maranello, to a name like this?”
Mick following in Michael’s footsteps Schumacher’s success is all the more incredible and poignant given his journey. As a 14-year-old, Mick was skiing with his father in France when Michael suffered severe head injuries, and he has not been seen in public since. Mick describes his father, the most successful F1 driver of all-time who won the German F3 title as a youngster, as his role model. “It’s a slightly unreal feeling – I’m absolutely delighted,” said Mick after his own F3 triumph. “I still can’t quite believe it.” Schumacher won the championship in his second season, after finishing 12th in his rookie year. He won eight races in 2018, starting at Spa, where his father made his F1 debut with Jordan. His main rival was Britain’s Dan Ticktum, who controversially described Mick’s pace in the second half of the season as “interesting” and claimed: “Unfortunately however I am fighting a losing battle as my last name is not Schumacher.” But Schumacher, watched on by mother Corinna as he won his title, shrugged off such suggestions. He is now focused on working his way up to F1 – looking to add to the 13 father-son combinations to make it into the top category. In this form, there won’t be a shortage of interested teams. Mick Schumacher has been backed to emulate his legendary father and become “one of the greats” after sealing his first single-seater championship. Schumacher, the son of seven-time Formula 1 world champion Michael, claimed the European Formula 3 title with a race to spare at Hockenheim on Saturday. It has been a breakthrough season for the 19-year-old, part of the Mercedes-powered PREMA squad.   Early on in his career, Schumacher raced under his mother’s maiden name of Betsch to avoid the extra attention and pressure but now he is earning praise, regardless of his surname. “Attention was focused on the youngster right from the start, and he was under a lot of pressure,” said Mercedes F1 boss Toto Wolff. “It’s not easy coping with all that, especially if the season does not get off to the best of starts, as in this case. “His performance in the second half of the season was therefore all the more impressive. He has shown that he has what it takes and that he can become one of the greats in our sport.” Gerhard Berger, the former Ferrari driver and 10-time F1 race-winner, added: “Mick has the racing genes of Michael. If he can continue to deliver performances like these, he will find his way into F1.” By claiming the championship, Mick has earned a ‘super license’ to compete in F1 next year but considering the dearth of seats on the grid, it is far more likely that he takes the next step up the motorsport ladder in Formula Two. Schumacher has not yet been snapped up by an F1 team for their junior programme, but has been linked with Mercedes due to his F3 affiliation, while Ferrari, where his father won five of his championships, have also expressed an interest. “We will see about the future,” said Ferrari chief Maurzio Arrivabene in September. “How can you say no, in Maranello, to a name like this?”
Mick following in Michael’s footsteps Schumacher’s success is all the more incredible and poignant given his journey. As a 14-year-old, Mick was skiing with his father in France when Michael suffered severe head injuries, and he has not been seen in public since. Mick describes his father, the most successful F1 driver of all-time who won the German F3 title as a youngster, as his role model. “It’s a slightly unreal feeling – I’m absolutely delighted,” said Mick after his own F3 triumph. “I still can’t quite believe it.” Schumacher won the championship in his second season, after finishing 12th in his rookie year. He won eight races in 2018, starting at Spa, where his father made his F1 debut with Jordan. His main rival was Britain’s Dan Ticktum, who controversially described Mick’s pace in the second half of the season as “interesting” and claimed: “Unfortunately however I am fighting a losing battle as my last name is not Schumacher.” But Schumacher, watched on by mother Corinna as he won his title, shrugged off such suggestions. He is now focused on working his way up to F1 – looking to add to the 13 father-son combinations to make it into the top category. In this form, there won’t be a shortage of interested teams. Sky Sports F1 is the only place to watch every Formula 1 Grand Prix, qualifying and practice session live in 2018. Get Sky Sports F1.
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From www.beyondseattime.com

The differences between average, good, and great autocrossers

Average autocrossers may lack a few major driving tools/skills. For example, they might struggle with car placement, lack smoothness, etc. They also have a less clear idea of what they are doing wrong or how to fix it. That said, average autocrossers occasionally shine, and collect trophies at national events from time to time. Good autocrossers often make the same mistakes as average autocrossers, but usually recognize their mistakes, and have strategies to avoid those mistakes in the future. Good autocrossers will frequently have success, win national events, but struggle to do it consistently. Great autocrossers enjoy repeated success at the highest levels because they have put in the work, and are experts at limiting mistakes and executing under pressure.

A couple of months ago, I reached out to some top tier drivers (Bryan Heitkotter, Brian Peters, Andy Hollis, Erik Strelnieks, Sam Strano, Tom O’Gorman, John Vitamvas, Dave Ogburn, Daniel McCelvey, Andrew Pallotta, and more) to dig into the differences between average, good, and great autocrossers. Even though their thoughts on the subject varied based on their own experiences and paths to success, there were several clear themes that emerged.

One of them wrote a sentence that resonated particularly well with me, and was remarkably succinct:

“Average autocrossers turn to miss cones; good autocrossers turn around cones; great autocrossers turn into cones, but don’t hit them.”

The point isn’t about how or when we turn in relation to cones, but is about considering ALL of the pieces that go into making that happen. Driving fast involves a collection of learned skills… grip sensitivity, yaw sensitivity, using weight transfer, using vision effectively, knowing how to “make” speed (cutting distance when appropriate, being less smooth when needed, etc), slaloming technique, braking ability, etc. Progressing from average to good requires improving many of these physical skills and a few mental skills. Progressing from good to great is much more about optimizing our approach to learning and mastering the mental side of the game than it is about any particular driving technique.

Vision
It is cliche to say, but a big part of the difference between average, good, and great comes down to looking ahead. While we all know and preach this idea, there is more to it than simply looking ahead. Rather, it’s important to understand why we look ahead, and critically, to then use that information to inform how we attack the course. The objective is to process, as early as possible, the sequence of actions we need to take, in order to proceed through the course at maximum velocity. How and when we processes this information plays a huge role in the pace we are able to realize.

We’ve all heard some drivers (or ourselves) say, “You know, I feel like I’m looking ahead, but I’m just not getting it.”

How we use our vision matters, but only if we use it to translate information into action.

The mere action of looking ahead is not enough on its own. We have to be able to take that information and translate it into inputs – throttle, braking, steering, even shifting. The good autocrosser focuses on improving that translation time into inputs, while the average autocrosser simply looks because everyone has been telling them forever to look ahead.

Car control and sensitivity to the limit
The limits of a vehicle are not static; they are constantly changing as the weight of the vehicle moves around. It is to our benefit to not just be aware of how this weight transfer affects available grip (at each axle, as well as the vehicle as a whole), but to also know how to manipulate weight transfer to our advantage when needed! Instead of just feeling the limit of the tires at each axle to tell if one end of the car is about to slide, we need to hone our ability to feel the limit of the vehicle as a whole to evaluate if we are moving the car on our intended trajectory with maximum efficiency.

Great car control is not about catching and holding slides; it is about controlling the position and rotation of our vehicle at the highest possible velocity.

Perhaps the most overlooked nuance is that the greatest drivers tend to load into and come off the tire’s limits with a softness or finesse that results in “more area under the curve”. The importance of this simply cannot be overstated. The best drivers are able to enjoy the benefit of more grip (during the transitional phases of cornering) than less advanced drivers because how they load and unload the tires results in more available grip. They actively manipulate the rate and placement of weight transfer instead of just reacting to it.

Commitment to learning and practice
To improve in a sport as ego driven as racing, we must put our egos aside and truly evaluate our strengths and weaknesses. It is human nature to draw comfort from the things we already do well, and lose focus on the things we need to improve. How many of us watch our own videos and fall into the trap of celebrating what we did well and making excuses for what we did poorly? How many of us are able to (consistently) objectively review our performances, make detailed notes about what we need to improve, formulate a plan to work on it, and track our progress?

I love how one of the respondents phrased it: “When we make excuses about our performance and pin the blame on things that are outside of our control, we miss the point. We lost. That means we can be better. Sure, maybe the car, tires, phase of the moon, karma, etc let us down, but it is also likely that we did not perform at 100% of our capability, or that 100% of our current capability is not good enough (yet).”

If there’s something we don’t know, we shouldn’t use lack of knowledge as an excuse. Learn! Read a book, or ask someone (who actually knows what they are talking about) for help. Everybody (and I mean everybody, including those with 10+ national championships) has a part of their game that is weaker than others. There is a wealth of knowledge out there in books, the internet, podcasts, people, etc. Attack what you don’t know, and learn it. It will not happen overnight.

Another respondent had this to say about practice: “Average autocrossers don’t practice enough, and don’t do enough big events against the best drivers. Good autocrossers practice but don’t focus on quality practice. I see tons of really good drivers burning up tires taking 10, 20, 30 runs on the practice course at nationals, making the same mistakes over and over. They make changes to the car, not knowing what those changes are doing, but convincing themselves that they’re making the car better. Great drivers keep detailed setup logs and if they test, they test in a rigorous manner. Great drivers admit when they need help and they seek it out from people who have the strengths that they themselves lack.”

Mental approach
Average autocrossers don’t have a plan when they take a run. They don’t have a plan for how to improve from run to run other than “go faster”. Good autocrossers often develop a rigid plan for how to attack the course. They may brake somewhere on the course because during their course walks they were sure that was a “slow” section. Great autocrossers develop a plan for where they want the car, and let their visual cues determine how fast they can go. They have no preconceived notions about where to brake or where to get on the gas, but they have a very vivid idea of where they want the car to be.

Great autocrossers spend time on mental preparation. This ranges from knowing how to get themselves in the zone, to identifying their weaknesses and developing a plan to mitigate them. Great drivers are not thinking about losing because they are committed to winning.

If losing makes you want to give up, you need to reprogram your mindset. Losing should make you pissed off and want to work harder, not give up.

The mental fortitude required for autocross is outrageous. So often, championships are won and lost on a single run, a single turn, a single cone. We typically only get one shot at a course to make it count when conditions are optimized. Great drivers are able to push through and make that one run when they need to. You don’t get to that level without a well thought out plan and extreme focus.

99% of autocross is spent not on course, and great drivers maximize that time to prepare for the 1% of the time that they are.

Willingness to put in the work
Not all of us aim to be great, and that is perfectly fine! Having fun is important. But I suspect that most of us are drawn to autocross not just for the “fun”, but also because we are competitive, which means we want to perform well (and improve). And the reality is that, as with any activity, if we want to get better at autocross, it is going to take work. There are real life hurdles that get in the way… our day jobs, family, other interests, money, etc. But let’s be clear about one thing; the great autocrossers make the time to put in the work.

I really like what one respondent had to say about this: “Note that someone who is great, may not be great all the time. If real life gets in the way of their focus, or financial constraints get in the way of prep, or time constraints get in the way of practice, their performance suffers.”

Greatness is temporary and only lasts with constant upkeep.

Just because we don’t see the work they put in doesn’t mean it comes easier for them. There are no shortcuts. It is very easy to convince ourselves that we have reached our potential and there is nothing more we can do because anyone faster than us is simply more talented. There is a fantastic post about this from the iRacing Virtual Racing School. The sentiment can be summed up with this: The moment you resign yourself to believing you’ll never be great is when you guarantee it being the case.

People love to debate how much talent matters (or not), but the fact is, that discussion is pointless because we have no idea how talented other people are! We only know our own experience. The only thing that is directly in our control is deciding how much work we are willing to put in to realize our potential.

A closing thought about how our brains work
In his book “Thinking Fast and Slow”, psychologist Daniel Kahneman tells us that our brains have 2 “systems” that make up how we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and runs as a background task on auto-pilot. System 2 is the opposite; slow, deliberate, logical, and is computationally expensive and demands conscious attention. The more of our driving tasks that we are able to hand off to System 1, the more mental capacity we free up to deal with the things we cannot plan for.

One final thought: Learning happens when we process information, and turn it into actionable insights, and eventually into habits. “Seat time” is one source of information, but it is far from the only source. Don’t limit your sources.

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2ndCar Success Story: Mercedes W210 E320

The seller of this well kept ’98 Mercedes E320 came prepared to sell his car to its new owner…title in hand, all maintenance records, ect. His attention to detail helped make the purchase for the new owner easy. “I chose 2ndCar because it was free to list and had to do no work to manage my car during the sales process. Tom and the team made it easy to work with them.”- Dave (Seller) The new owner couldn’t be more thrilled. He’s been using the Benz for daily driving on the open roads of Texas, and since his purchase has added 4,700 miles in just over a month without incident! “I couldn’t be happier. Not only was the seller cool and we took care of the transaction the way we wanted to, the car is just great. I’ve seen dozens of w210’s on the road in the last month, this has been by far the nicest one I’ve encountered…great car, great price, thanks 2ndcar” -AJ (Buyer)
 
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The New Moby Dick is here…and its GLORIOUS!!

Porsche surprised its fans (and everyone else) with the new 935 Clubsport, which was revealed during Rennsport Reunion in California.

The new track warrior pays homage to the classic 935/78 race car which is also known as the Moby Dick, thanks to its extended curvy bodywork that resembles the shape of a whale. The new 935’s bodywork is made almost in its entirety out of carbon-fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP), which helps keep the weight down to 3,042 lbs (1,380 kg)

The chassis is based on that of the current 911 GT2 RS, including the powertrain; that means that a twin-turbo 3.8-liter flat-six engine hangs out in the back producing 690hp (700PS). A seven-speed dual-clutch transmission with rigid mounts is tasked with sending the power to the rear axle via a limited-slip differential optimized for racing.

The new extended body means that the 935 is now 191.5 inches (4,865 mm) long, 80 inches (2,034 mm) wide and 53.5 inches (1,359 mm) tall. That’s 12.4 inches (316 mm) longer than the standard GT2 RS.

The wheels are plain gorgeous, featuring the classic aerodynamically enhanced design that was also present in the original 935, while the LED lights come straight from the 919 Hybrid LMP1. Finally, the exposed titanium tailpipes are modelled on those from the 1968 908.

Porsche will make just 77 units of the new 935, which won’t be eligible for driving on public roads. Pricing in Europe has been set at 701,948 euros (around $815k in current exchange rates) plus the country-specific taxes. The new 935 will be imported in the USA by Porsche Motorsport North America of Carson, California, with an official U.S. pricing to be announced on a later date. First deliveries are expected to begin in June 2019.

-Source: Carscoops.com

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Welcome to 2ndCar!!

2ndCar.com

We aren’t just a business…at 2ndCar.com we’re car enthusiasts just like you. That means we live & breathe cars every day. Whether its track events, DIY tips, or just good car stories…we want to share with the community. Feel free to submit good articles you find or even write, and we’ll post ’em!

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